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Systemic Thinking
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Can the Opponent Be Moved or Transformed?
It is a widespread misunderstanding that you can press somebody to move in a certain direction, and you can do it via commands, criticism or scolding. The few situations when this is possible are about relations between subordinates and superiors, and only a limited part of a party’s life is subject to instructions. The ways of creative thinking cannot be directed by others and brainwashing is a myth. You can interfere, yet that interference will lead to a change. But, this disturbance is only partly master of the exchange. The human being – keeping in mind that the opponent is included in this category – is a self-regulating (autopoietic [1]) mechanism that must be convinced to go the direction that you want. This realisation is an important part of the systemic grounding for cognitive-systemic mediation. [1] The biologists Humberto Maturana and Francisco Varela, The Tree of Knowledge, 1992.
 
Autopoiesis
Autopoiesis illustrates why you cannot press somebody’s mind and creativity into to a certain direction.The idea of brainwashing emerged during the Korean War. The CIA looking for means to change an individuals’ mind into a democratic mindset, and they arrived at the conclusion that brainwashing was not effective. Now you have the explanation.
 
Domain Theory
The domain theory may be helpful in clarifying whether individuals communicate within the same domain or frame (value comprehension). Is the mediation to be conducted within the frames of production’s or reflection’s domain? If the mediator, using the domain theory, realises that he cannot see the world through the same frame as the parties, he must do something about that. Otherwise, he will create more problems than he will solve.
 
Neutrality
Neutral is only what the parties experience as neutral.
 
Cognitive-Systemic Mediation
A number of useful training videos on mediation can be ordered by ACR’s book store http://www.acrnet.org/library/catalogue.htm#pcmvideos.If you press Positive Conflict Management Videos you will get to http://www.acrnet.org/library/catalogue.htm#pcmvideos where you find the whole series of systemic mediation training videos with John Haynes and Larry Fong as the mediators (NTSC)If you want the videos with Norwegian subtitles, you order by Kirkens Familierådgivning, Otta, Norway (PAL) http://www.kfotta.no/videoer.htm
 
The Conflict Story
 

Adoption: The Chaos of Changing Consent.

An unwed mother has put her son up for adoption through a private agency. Just as she is about to sign the papers she has second thoughts and wants to negotiate some way of being involved in her son’s future. The adoptive parents are afraid of what such a future would be like for all involved. The mediator helps them examine these issues in the light of what is best for the
child.
 
Some of the following video cuts are from
ADOPTION:
THE CHAOS OF CHANGING CONSENT

with Larry Fong as mediator

Price: $75.00

Order Code: V-1

Tape Running Time: 45 minutes
 
Business of Bagels : A Partnership Business Dispute John Haynes is mediating between Dan and Ross owning a bakery business producing bagels. Dan runs the production end of the business while Ross handles the sales. A variety of partnership issues come into play with differing opinions on how to manage the business, including finances, labour, and capital expenditures. The mediator helps the partners find a mutual definition of the problems and assists them in examining alternative solutions to their problems.The technical quality will be improved so the surface noise disappears.
 
Videotraining clips ↓
A systemic mediators opening (5 mb)

BUSINESS OF BAGELS:
A PARTNERSHIP BUSINESS DISPUTE
Featuring: Dr. John Haynes
Price: $75.00
Order Code: HV-1010


Tape Running Time: 41 minutes


The full dialogues of Chaos of Changing Consent and Business of Bagels:
A Partnership Business Dispute you will
find in the book, Mediation:
Positive Conflict Management,
State University of New York Press, 2004


Order by
http://www.amazon.com/Mediation -
Management-
Transpersonal-Humanistic-
Psychology/dp/0791459527

 
Self-Concept
The cognitive-systemic mediator listens first and foremost to the parties’ narratives for issues that might be subject to negotiation.
 
Context
Before the parties really start dealing with the negotiations, the mediator tries to get the parties’ original wishes and goals to surface in a logical overriding frame (context).
 
Systemic Influence
In the universe of systemic theory, the relation and therefore the interaction between the individual components of the system are far more interesting that the individual components themselves.
 
Circular Questions
Examples:
“Have you been exposed to something similar before?”
“Do you know how others solve a similar problem?”
“Is something lacking that, if it was present, would make the problem easier to solve?”
“How would you solve a similar problem if it were to surface five years from now?”
“What would you advise your close friend to do if he had a similar problem?”
 
The Metastory
The cognitive-systemic mediator not only listens for issues suitable for negotiation. He also listens for a party’s use of language, and what it contains of narratives within itself about value concepts of the speaker.
 
When the Solid Disappears
Parties in crisis and parties reviving the traumatic experiences.
 
Metaphors
The mediator listen carefully to metaphors employed.
 
The Underlying Story
The underlying story is different from the metastory, and is rather like the next layer in an onion. Each layer represents a new edition of reality.
 
The Gatekeeper
How to identify the gatekeeper having the keys to the data of the system?
 
Strategic Summarising
Mediator makes his choices trusting that a party who wants an ignored component to be a part of the collective memory and future narrative will repeat the component in his upcoming narratives and answers until the mediator includes it in his summarising.
Roles
A party cannot sustain a role unless he has the cooperation of the mediator.
 
Safe Environment
In mediation, the parties may gain new insight that can make them change course from what they started the mediation with. The task of the mediator is to create a safe environment for such course changes.
 
Example
Study the transcript of the dialog between mediator Larry Fong and his clients, Vicky, Janice and Henri at page ...
 
Exercise
Try to answer the questions below
 
  1. Mention some differences between cognitive-systemic and generic mediation.
  2. Mention some differences between cognitive-systemic and humanistic mediation.
  3. What is autopoiesis?
  4. Is the human being a system?
  5. What is special about closed systems in relation to influence from the outside?
  6. Try to express respectively an empathetic and a cognitive-empathetic sentence.
  7. Why might a cognitive-systemic mediator does not use emotions as tools during the mediation?
  8. What is context?
  9. What understanding do you reach by thinking about thinking?
  10. Try to form five circular-reflective questions.
  11. What is the difference between the metastory and the underlying story?
  12. What is the systemically regarded reason why you cannot afflict your assumptions of what is natural, decent or true on another person?
  13. What effect does it have if you get into a situation where your paradigm is ignored?
  14. How does the cognitive-systemic mediator assist the party in making an apology?
  15. What component must an apology contain to be empathetic?
  16. What can you use domain theory for?
  17. Give ten examples that fall respectively into the domains of the aesthetic, production or reflection?
  18. What is neutrality seen from a systemic perspective?
  19. What can you use hypotheses for?
  20. What is the disadvantage of using hypotheses?
  21. Mention differences in how empowerment is developed in generic, transformative, humanistic and cognitive-systemic mediation respectively.
  22. Mention differences in how recognition is developed in generic, transformative, humanistic and cognitive-systemic mediation respectively.
 

 

Book's Website Day 4
 
Humanistic Mediation
 
Systemic Thinking
(No content yet)
 
 
Can the Opponent Be Moved or Transformed?
 
It is a widespread misunderstanding that you can press somebody to move in a certain direction, and you can do it via commands, criticism or scolding. The few situations when this is possible are about relations between subordinates and superiors, and only a limited part of a party’s life is subject to instructions. The ways of creative thinking cannot be directed by others and brainwashing is a myth. You can interfere, yet that interference will lead to a change. But, this disturbance is only partly master of the exchange. The human being – keeping in mind that the opponent is included in this category – is a self-regulating (autopoietic [1]) mechanism that must be convinced to go the direction that you want. This realisation is an important part of the systemic grounding for cognitive-systemic mediation.
 
[1] The biologists Humberto Maturana and Francisco Varela, The Tree of Knowledge, 1992. 
 
 
Autopoiesis
 
Autopoiesis illustrates why you cannot press somebody’s mind and creativity into to a certain direction.The idea of brainwashing emerged during the Korean War. The CIA looking for means to change an individuals’ mind into a democratic mindset, and they arrived at the conclusion that brainwashing was not effective. Now you have the explanation.
 
 
Domain Theory
 
The domain theory may be helpful in clarifying whether individuals communicate within the same domain or frame (value comprehension). Is the mediation to be conducted within the frames of production’s or reflection’s domain? If the mediator, using the domain theory, realises that he cannot see the world through the same frame as the parties, he must do something about that. Otherwise, he will create more problems than he will solve.
 
 
Neutrality
 
Neutral is only what the parties experience as neutral.
 
 
Cognitive-Systemic Mediation
 
A number of useful training videos on mediation can be ordered by ACR’s book store http://www.acrnet.org/library/catalogue.htm#pcmvideos.
 
If you press Positive Conflict Management Videos you will get to http://www.acrnet.org/library/catalogue.htm#pcmvideos where you find the whole series of systemic mediation training videos with John Haynes and Larry Fong as the mediators (NTSC)
 
If you want the videos with Norwegian subtitles, you order by Kirkens Familierådgivning, Otta, Norway (PAL) http://www.kfotta.no/videoer.htm
 
 
The Conflict Story
Adoption: The Chaos of Changing Consent.
 
An unwed mother has put her son up for adoption through a private agency. Just as she is about to sign the papers she has second thoughts and wants to negotiate some way of being involved in her son’s future. The adoptive parents are afraid of what such a future would be like for all involved. The mediator helps them examine these issues in the light of what is best for the child.
 
 

 

 
 
 
Business of Bagels :
A Partnership Business Dispute John Haynes is mediating between Dan and Ross owning a bakery business producing bagels. Dan runs the production end of the business while Ross handles the sales. A variety of partnership issues come into play with differing opinions on how to manage the business, including finances, labour, and capital expenditures. The mediator helps the partners find a mutual definition of the problems and assists them in examining alternative solutions to their problems.The technical quality will be improved so the surface noise disappears.
 
 
Videotraining clips ↓
 
 

Some of the following video cuts are from
ADOPTION:
THE CHAOS OF CHANGING CONSENT
with Larry Fong as mediator


Price: $75.00


Order Code: V-1


Tape Running Time: 45 minutes
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
BUSINESS OF BAGELS:
A PARTNERSHIP BUSINESS DISPUTE
Featuring: Dr. John Haynes
Price: $75.00
Order Code: HV-1010

Tape Running Time: 41 minutes

The full dialogues of Chaos of Changing Consent and Business of Bagels:
A Partnership Business Dispute you will
find in the book, Mediation:
Positive Conflict Management,
State University of New York Press, 2004

Order by
http://www.amazon.com/Mediation-Management-Transpersonal-Humanistic-Psychology/dp/0791459527-
Management-
Transpersonal-Humanistic-
Psychology/dp/0791459527
 
 
 
 
  
Self-Concept
 
The cognitive-systemic mediator listens first and foremost to the parties’ narratives for issues that might be subject to negotiation.
 
 
Context
 
Before the parties really start dealing with the negotiations, the mediator tries to get the parties’ original wishes and goals to surface in a logical overriding frame (context).
 
Systemic Influence
 
In the universe of systemic theory, the relation and therefore the interaction between the individual components of the system are far more interesting that the individual components themselves.
 
Circular Questions
 
Examples:
“Have you been exposed to something similar before?”
“Do you know how others solve a similar problem?”
“Is something lacking that, if it was present, would make the problem easier to solve?”
“How would you solve a similar problem if it were to surface five years from now?”
“What would you advise your close friend to do if he had a similar problem?”
 
 
The Metastory
 
The cognitive-systemic mediator not only listens for issues suitable for negotiation. He also listens for a party’s use of language, and what it contains of narratives within itself about value concepts of the speaker.
 
 
When the Solid Disappears
 
Parties in crisis and parties reviving the traumatic experiences.
 
Metaphors
 
The mediator listen carefully to metaphors employed.
 
 
The Underlying Story
 
The underlying story is different from the metastory, and is rather like the next layer in an onion. Each layer represents a new edition of reality.
 
 
The Gatekeeper
 
How to identify the gatekeeper having the keys to the data of the system?
 
 
Strategic Summarising
 
Mediator makes his choices trusting that a party who wants an ignored component to be a part of the collective memory and future narrative will repeat the component in his upcoming narratives and answers until the mediator includes it in his summarising.
 
Roles
 
A party cannot sustain a role unless he has the cooperation of the mediator.
 
 
Safe Environment
 
In mediation, the parties may gain new insight that can make them change course from what they started the mediation with. The task of the mediator is to create a safe environment for such course changes.
 
 
Example
 
Study the transcript of the dialog between mediator Larry Fong and his clients, Vicky, Janice and Henri at page ...
 
 
Exercise
 
Try to answer the questions below
 
  1. Mention some differences between cognitive-systemic and generic mediation.
  2. Mention some differences between cognitive-systemic and humanistic mediation.
  3. What is autopoiesis?
  4. Is the human being a system?
  5. What is special about closed systems in relation to influence from the outside?
  6. Try to express respectively an empathetic and a cognitive-empathetic sentence.
  7. Why might a cognitive-systemic mediator does not use emotions as tools during the mediation?
  8. What is context?
  9. What understanding do you reach by thinking about thinking?
  10. Try to form five circular-reflective questions.
  11. What is the difference between the metastory and the underlying story?
  12. What is the systemically regarded reason why you cannot afflict your assumptions of what is natural, decent or true on another person?
  13. What effect does it have if you get into a situation where your paradigm is ignored?
  14. How does the cognitive-systemic mediator assist the party in making an apology?
  15. What component must an apology contain to be empathetic?
  16. What can you use domain theory for?
  17. Give ten examples that fall respectively into the domains of the aesthetic, production or reflection?
  18. What is neutrality seen from a systemic perspective?
  19. What can you use hypotheses for?
  20. What is the disadvantage of using hypotheses?
  21. Mention differences in how empowerment is developed in generic, transformative, humanistic and cognitive-systemic mediation respectively.
  22. Mention differences in how recognition is developed in generic, transformative, humanistic and cognitive-systemic mediation respectively.
 
 
 
    
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